Cycling in Italy

Do you want to do some cycling on your next holiday to Italy? Want to know when and where to go cycling in Italy? Our guide gives you useful facts & information about cycling in Italy that you’ll want to know.

Cycling is a popular activity among Italian people and every year thousands of cycling enthusiasts from across the world comes to Italy to enjoy some fantastic cycling experiences. Two factors that make Italy such a great cycling destination are the idyllic weather and the beautiful landscape to be found across Italy.

Cycling and Trains in Italy

Unlike cycling in other European countries like Spain or Switzerland, cyclists visiting Italy may find it slightly more difficult to get around on public transport with their bicycle. Many trains in Italy do allow passengers to bring on board bicycles; however, there are some trains that do not cater for cyclists. Generally, the long distance national train services tend not to have bicycle compartments while nearly all of the regional train services do offer bicycle storage facilities on board their trains. The best thing to do if you are unsure is to look for the bicycle logo on the side of the train which indicates that there is a bicycle carriage on board.

It is forbidden to bring your bicycle in the passenger cabin on all trains in Italy. The cost of bringing your bicycle on board a train is quite cheap and the best option to go for is a one day bicycle pass which cots 3.50 Euros and allows you to take your bicycle on as many trains as you like for one day. This is a good option if you are thinking about doing a few short cycling runs in one day and want to use the trains in between.

Cycling season in Italy

Because the weather in Italy is generally so good all year round, there is no cycling season per say, and a great time can be had cycling in Italy at almost any time of the year. The obvious exception to this would by cycling in the Alps in the north of Italy during the winter season when snowfall is expected. Italy is not an excessively rainy country and the chances are you will not see much rain while cycling; however, it’s best to pack a water proof top just in case.

Cycling Routes in Italy

Italy has literally hundreds of cycling routes that span the length and breadth of the country. Wherever you go in Italy the chances are that there are some great cycling routes nearby. The best place to get information on scenic cycling routes in Italy is the tourist information office of the town in Italy you happen to be staying in. The countryside in Tuscany is particularly popular with cycling tourists from abroad, because of the lovely warm weather and beautiful countryside. The town of Florence is also quite nearby if one is looking for other forms of entertainment in Italy.

Cycling Competitions in Italy

The main cycling competition held in Italy is the Giro d’Italia which is held yearly in May. This long distance cycling competition is held in stages and lasts about three weeks in all. Professional cyclists from all over the world come to compete in this competition which has been going since the 1930’s; however, Italian cyclists have historically dominated this competition.

Cycling Rules in Italy

In true Mediterranean fashion there seems to be little regard paid to health and safety measures in Italy and this is seen in the attitude that is taken towards cycling in Italy. There are no official road rules for cycling in Italy and it is up to you whether you wear a helmet or reflectors. Of course in the interests of safety it’s always best to take proper safety precautions while cycling in Italy.

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Corneliu says:

Actually, reflective wear and proper lights (red in the back, white in the front) are mandatory in Italy, during the nighttime (considered to be starting half an hour after the sunset to one hour before the sunrise), and while you are riding through tunnels at any time.